Communion

WHAT IS COMMUNION?

Communion, often “The Lord’s Supper,” is a memorial in which Christians identify with the crucifixion of Jesus Christ (see 1 Corinthians 10:16; 11:20). It’s a time for believers to remember that the Lord gave His body and shed his blood for all people. (see Luke 22:19-20).

INSTITUTION OF COMMUNION

Jesus Christ instituted Communion on the eve of His death when He ate the Passover meal with His disciples (see Matthew 26:26-29; Mark 14:22:14-20; 1 Corinthians 11:23-25).

MEANING AND SYMBOLISM OF COMMUNION

Bread and wine were once served for the Lord’s Supper. Today, many churches, including ours, use crackers and grape juice. The bread symbolizes Christ’s body, which was beaten and battered for us as He died for the sins of humanity. The cup symbolizes His blood, which was shed for us as He paid for our sins (see John 10:17-18; Ephesians 1:7; Romans 5:8-9.

ESSENTIALS FOR OBSERVING COMMUNION

Anyone who participates in the Lord’s Supper must first be a believer. Jesus commanded His disciples to observe Communion (see Matthew 26:26); therefore, a person must have placed his or her faith in Jesus Christ for salvation before taking part in communion.

In addition to being believers, we must prepare our hearts to participate in the Lord’s Supper. Paul instructed believers not to “eat this bread or drink this cup in an unworthy manner…” (1 Corinthians 11:27).

Last, we must examine our lives for any unconfessed sin. Paul reminds us, “Let a man examine himself” (1 Corinthians 11:28)

We corporately celebrate Communion as a church body on the 2nd weekend of each month.